Prentice Hall Magruders American Government 2004 Correlated

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Prentice Hall Magruder's American Government  2004
                           Correlated to:
   New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies, Civics,
              Citizenship, & Government Standards
                     (Commencement Level)
  NEW YORK LEARNING STANDARDS FOR                                  PAGE(S) WHERE TAUGHT
                SOCIAL STUDIES                         (If submission is not a text, cite appropriate resource(s))
New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies (Revised Edition, June 1996)

Standard 5--Civics, Citizenship, and Government

Commencement

Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for
establishing governments; the governmental system of the U.S. and other nations; the U.S. Constitution; the basic
civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship,
including avenues of participation.

1. The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of
government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power,
authority, governance, and law. (Adapted from The National Standards for Civics and Government, 1994)

Students:

        analyze how the values of a nation and              SE/TE: 4, 5, 10, 25, 76, 77, 494-498, 533, 534, 535,
         international organizations affect the                     569, 570
         guarantee of human rights and make
         provisions for human needs

        consider the nature and evolution of                SE/TE: 7, 8, 12, 13, 18-22, 24, 25, 28-32, 34-39, 44-
         constitutional democracies throughout the                  47, 48-54
         world

        compare various political systems with that of      SE/TE: 12-16, 122, 123, 168, 227, 264, 357, 485, 587,
         the United States in terms of ideology,                    609, 626-632, 634-638, 639-643, 645-649,
         structure, function, institutions, decision-               650-652, 654, 655, 669, 670, 710
         making processes, citizenship roles, and            TE:    119, 269
         political culture

        identify and analyze advantages and                 SE/TE: 5, 12-16, 24, 25, 122, 123, 626-632, 634-638,
         disadvantages of various governmental                      639-643, 645-649, 650-652, 654, 655
         systems.

This is evident, for example, when students:

              analyze excerpts from the writings of          SE/TE: 7, 8, 11, 25, 53
              Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and others
              of the Enlightenment Period




                                    SE = Student Edition        TE = Teacher Edition
              Numbers = Key Ideas          Bullets = Performance Indicators     Triangles = Sample Tasks
                                                            1
                  Prentice Hall Magruder's American Government  2004
                                       Correlated to
   New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies, Civics, Citizenship, & Government
                            Standards, (Commencement Level)

  NEW YORK LEARNING STANDARDS FOR                                         PAGE(S) WHERE TAUGHT
           SOCIAL STUDIES                                     (If submission is not a text, cite appropriate resource(s))
         explain what the term "social                       SE/TE: 8, 25, 53
           contract" means and how it was
           applied to the establishment of civil
           society and legitimate government in
           many areas of the world

              compare various political systems              SE/TE: 12-16, 168, 227, 264, 357, 485, 587, 609, 626-
              throughout the world with that of the                 632, 634-638, 639-643, 645-649, 650-652,
              United States in terms of their                       654, 655, 669, 670, 710
              ideologies, structures, functions,             TE:    269
              institutions, decision-making
              processes, citizenship roles, and
              political cultures. (Adapted from
              Curriculum Standards for the Social
              Studies, NCSS)

              compare and contrast the American              SE/TE: 88-95, 624-632, 634-643, 644-649, 654, 655
              federal system with that of other
              democratic nations.

2. The state and federal governments established by the Constitutions of the United States and the State of New
York embody basic civic values (such as justice, honesty, self-discipline, due process, equality, majority rule with
respect for minority rights, and respect for self, others, and property), principles, and practices and establish a
system of shared and limited government. (Adapted from The National Standards for Civics and Government,
1994)

Students:

        trace the evolution of American values,             SE/TE: 7, 8, 18-22, 28-32, 34-39, 44-47, 48-54, 56-
         beliefs, and institutions                                  58, 74, 75, 119, 120, 126-131, 148-150, 159-
                                                                    163, 262, 263, 269, 306, 307, 360, 361, 365-
                                                                    367, 391, 392, 446-448, 481-489, 532, 533,
                                                                    546-549, 564, 565, 569, 570, 576, 577, 585-
                                                                    588, 604, 605, 640, 641, 690, 691

        analyze the disparities between civic values        The foundation of this standard can be found on pages:
         expressed in the United States Constitution         SE/TE: 64-70, 150, 159-163, 533, 538-544, 546-553,
         and the United Nation Universal Declaration                 556-559, 560, 561, 564-568, 569-574, 576-
         of Human Rights and the realities as                        583, 585-588, 601-606, 758-767, 768-777,
         evidenced in the political, social, and                     778-779
         economic life in the United States and
         throughout the world

        identify, respect, and model those core civic       SE/TE: 28-32, 39, 44-47, 69-70, 148-150, 594-599,
         values inherent in our founding documents                  601-606, 608-612
         that have been forces for unity in American
         society
        compare and contrast the Constitutions of the       The foundation for this standard can be found on:
         United States and New York State                    SE/TE: 62-70, 72-77, 84, 85, 684-688


                                    SE = Student Edition        TE = Teacher Edition
              Numbers = Key Ideas          Bullets = Performance Indicators     Triangles = Sample Tasks
                                                            2
                  Prentice Hall Magruder's American Government  2004
                                       Correlated to
   New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies, Civics, Citizenship, & Government
                            Standards, (Commencement Level)

  NEW YORK LEARNING STANDARDS FOR                                         PAGE(S) WHERE TAUGHT
              SOCIAL STUDIES                                  (If submission is not a text, cite appropriate resource(s))
    understand the dynamic relationship between             SE/TE: 14, 15, 73-74, 86-95, 96-103, 105-111, 113,
     federalism and state's rights.                                 138, 506, 534-536, 681, 690, 691

This is evident, for example, when students:

              analyze how core American civic                SE/TE: 28-30, 33, 34-39, 40-43, 44, 45, 53, 62-70, 72-
              values are expressed in those                         77, 84, 85, 107, 148-150, 538-544, 546-553,
              documents that provide the basis for                  556-559, 560, 561, 564-568, 569-574, 576-
              our democratic form of government,                    583, 585-588, 601-606, 758-767, 768-777,
              including the Magna Carta, the                        778-779, 783-790
              Mayflower Compact, the Declaration             TE:    50, 69, 91, 129, 169, 183, 199, 227, 245, 272,
              of Independence, the Articles of                      297, 332, 373, 407, 433, 449, 472, 485, 52,
              Confederation, the Albany Plan of                     535, 549, 567, 571, 579, 603, 641, 711, 721
              Union, the Federalist papers, the
              Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and
              other amendments

              using the Declaration of                       SE/TE: 38, 39, 40-44
              Independence, find evidence of the
              influence of Locke and other
              Enlightenment philosophers on a
              political leader like Thomas Jefferson

              analyze key Supreme Court decisions            SE/TE: 23, 59, 83, 109, 143, 150, 153, 173, 203, 231,
              (e.g., Marbury v. Madison,                            255, 271, 272, 285, 297, 298, 306-308, 315,
              McCulloch v. Maryland, Dred Scott                     347, 385, 396, 397, 409, 441, 463, 499, 517-
              v. Sanford, Plessy v. Ferguson,                       522, 527, 535, 538-544, 543, 546-553, 556-
              Brown v. Board of Education of                        559, 560, 561, 564-568, 570-574, 577-583,
              Topeka, Miranda v. Arizona, and                       585-588, 589, 590, 591, 602-606, 610-612,
              Roe v. Wade) in terms of the ongoing                  619, 677, 713, 745, 799-806
              struggle to realize democratic ideals;         TE:    305, 569
              explore how these decisions embody
              constitutional civic values and the
              evolution and application of
              constitutional values within
              American political, economic, and
              social life

              present dramatic readings of key               SE/TE: 18, 21, 26, 341, 797, 798
              excerpts from speeches and writings
              of Daniel Webster, John C. Calhoun,
              Henry David Thoreau, Frederick
              Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln




                                    SE = Student Edition        TE = Teacher Edition
              Numbers = Key Ideas          Bullets = Performance Indicators     Triangles = Sample Tasks
                                                            3
                   Prentice Hall Magruder's American Government  2004
                                        Correlated to
    New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies, Civics, Citizenship, & Government
                             Standards, (Commencement Level)

  NEW YORK LEARNING STANDARDS FOR                                         PAGE(S) WHERE TAUGHT
           SOCIAL STUDIES                                     (If submission is not a text, cite appropriate resource(s))
         analyze the United States                           SE/TE: 64-70, 74, 75, 160, 161, 306, 307, 360, 361,
           Constitution, the United Nations                         494-498, 604, 605, 640, 641, 690, 691, 758-
           Universal Declaration of Human                           767, 768-777, 778-779
           Rights, United Nations Convention                 TE:    50, 69, 91, 129, 169, 183, 199, 227, 245, 272,
           on the Rights of the Child, the                          297, 332, 373, 407, 433, 449, 472, 485, 52,
           Charter of Amnesty International,                        535, 549, 567, 571, 579, 603, 641, 711, 721
           and other civil/human rights
           documents to identify and explain the
           significance of the fundamental
           values and principles which they
           espouse.

3. Central to civics and citizenship is an understanding of the roles of the citizen within American constitutional
democracy and the scope of a citizen's rights and responsibilities.

Students:

        understand how citizenship includes the             SE/TE: 3, 63, 87, 115, 125, 147-150, 152-155, 171,
         exercise of certain personal responsibilities,             177, 190, 195, 207, 222, 235, 241, 293, 319,
         including voting, considering the rights and               341, 353, 376, 389, 413, 436, 453, 523, 531,
         interests of others, behaving in a civil manner,           537-544, 546-553, 554-558, 560, 561, 563,
         and accepting responsibility for the                       593, 625, 644, 657, 683, 706, 717, 738,
         consequences of one's actions (Adapted from         TE:     2, 30, 62, 67, 101, 146, 140, 184, 226, 246,
         The National Standards for Civics and                      280, 297, 337, 352, 372, 388, 400, 412, 426,
         Government, 1994)                                          530, 557, 562, 578, 592, 631, 656, 699, 727

        analyze issues at the local, state, and national    SE/TE: 3, 27, 63, 87, 115, 147, 177, 207, 235, 261,
         levels and prescribe responses that promote                289, 319, 353, 389, 413, 445, 467, 505, 531,
         the public interest or general welfare, such as            563, 593, 625, 657, 683, 717, 725-732
         planning and carrying out a voter registration
         campaign

        describe how citizenship is defined by the          SE/TE: 302, 613-615, 620, 621
         Constitution and important laws

        explore how citizens influence public policy        SE/TE: 4, 13, 132, 133, 178-186, 195, 222, 236-240,
         in a representative democracy.                             242-247, 249-254, 256, 257, 272, 273, 277,
                                                                    278, 293, 436, 453, 461, 554, 706, 738, 744

This is evident, for example, when students:

              compare basic British political                SE/TE: 30, 626-633
              documents with the United States
              Constitution, identifying how each
              system defines leadership, a citizen's
              rights and responsibilities, and
              powers of the government




                                    SE = Student Edition        TE = Teacher Edition
              Numbers = Key Ideas          Bullets = Performance Indicators     Triangles = Sample Tasks
                                                            4
                  Prentice Hall Magruder's American Government  2004
                                       Correlated to
   New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies, Civics, Citizenship, & Government
                            Standards, (Commencement Level)

  NEW YORK LEARNING STANDARDS FOR                                         PAGE(S) WHERE TAUGHT
           SOCIAL STUDIES                                     (If submission is not a text, cite appropriate resource(s))
         outline how one can become a citizen                SE/TE: 195, 222, 293, 436, 453, 554, 613-615, 620,
           and analyze the rights and                               621, 706, 738
           responsibilities of citizenship

              plan and implement a voter                     SE/TE: 3, 27, 63, 87, 115, 147, 175, 177, 207, 235,
              registration campaign or other                        261, 289, 319, 353, 389, 413, 445, 467, 505,
              voluntary activity in the community                   531, 563, 593, 625, 657, 683, 717

              implement a student court to                   SE/TE: 529
              adjudicate in-school offenses                  TE:    702

              volunteer and support conflict                 The foundation for this objective can be found on:
              mediation programs within the                          SE/TE: 3, 27, 63, 87, 115, 147, 177, 207,
              school                                                 235, 261, 289, 319, 353, 389, 413, 445, 467,
                                                                     505, 531, 563, 593, 625, 657, 683, 717

              investigate local environmental                The foundation for this objective can be found on:
              issues and propose solutions based             SE/TE: 298, 413, 418, 422
              on state and federal environmental
              laws.

4. The study of civics and citizenship requires the ability to probe ideas and assumptions, ask and answer
analytical questions, take a skeptical attitude toward questionable arguments, evaluate evidence, formulate
rational conclusions, and develop and refine participatory skills.

Students:

        participate as informed citizens in the political   SE/TE: 3, 63, 87, 115, 125, 147-150, 152-155, 171,
         justice system and processes of the United                 177, 190, 195, 207, 222, 235, 241, 293, 319,
         States, including voting                                   341, 353, 368-375, 377-384, 376, 389, 413,
                                                                    436, 453, 506-511, 512-515, 517-523, 524-
                                                                    526, 528, 529, 531, 554, 563, 593, 625, 644,
                                                                    657, 683, 706, 717, 738,
                                                             TE:     2, 30, 62, 67, 101, 146, 140, 184, 226, 246,
                                                                    280, 297, 337, 352, 372, 388, 400, 412, 426,
                                                                    530, 557, 562, 578, 592, 631, 656, 699, 727

        evaluate, take, and defend positions on what        SE/TE: 22, 64-70, 85
         the fundamental values and principles of            TE:    15, 50, 69, 91, 129, 169, 183, 199, 227, 245,
         American political life are and their                      272, 297, 332, 373, 407, 433, 449, 472, 485,
         importance to the maintenance of                           52, 535, 549, 567, 571, 579, 603, 641, 711,
         constitutional democracy (Adapted from The                 721
         National Standards for Civics and
         Government, 1994)

        take, defend, and evaluate positions about          SE/TE: 61, 85, 233
         attitudes that facilitate thoughtful and
         effective participation in public affairs




                                    SE = Student Edition        TE = Teacher Edition
              Numbers = Key Ideas          Bullets = Performance Indicators     Triangles = Sample Tasks
                                                            5
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